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Before 1973, Polish émigré Walerian Borowczyk was a critical darling for his exquisite animated shorts and uniquely original live-action features: afterwards, he was almost a pariah.

Between those, The Lickerish Quartet was a fascinating anomaly, the furthest Metzger would venture into art cinema (Borges, Pasolini, Pirandello and Resnais were all acknowledged influences) while still keeping a beady eye on his target market.The premise concerns a bored middle-aged couple and their surprise encounter with a young woman who’s the living spit of an actor in a stag film that they’ve been watching to unsuccessfully spice up their marriage.Sex at the movies has been there from the start, with peep show titillations part of the illicit sideshows of early silent cinema.But censorship quickly became a buzz kill in the world of mainstream, commercial cinema, with the naughty suggestiveness of early 1930s Hollywood films soon snuffed out by the introduction of the Hays Code.Made on a shoestring, the film took a fortune at the box office and remained on London screens for several months.

Warren’s follow-up, Loving Feeling (1968), benefited from relaxed censorship rules and was also a financial success, but he had grown tired of the genre and moved on to pastures new.This new licentiousness led to sex films both softcore (Emmanuelle, 1974) and hardcore (Deep Throat, 1972) becoming box-office smashes, with ‘respectable’ middle-class couples queuing up with the dirty macs for a sneaky peek.In this period, arthouse sensations such as Last Tango in Paris (1972) and In the Realm of the Senses (1976) also used loosening censorship laws to explore eroticism on screen with a new frankness.In this postwar short for the Ministry of Health (available on the BFI Player and on the BFI DVD The Birds and the Bees), director J. Holmes, who was instrumental in the development of the story documentary, draws on the quintessential ingredients of ‘women’s films’ to ram home the message that marriage and motherhood are the right path to follow.What’s curious here is that while contemporary commercial features would have necessarily deployed a clever euphemistic device to skirt around the unsavoury medical issue at hand, this pithy but potent family drama addresses it head-on, much to the dismay of poor wayward Joan.One client in particular is a source of enduring mystery: the Japanese businessman who brings along a small box.